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Word: vote, cast a ballot

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Description/Reason:

to give one vote in a democratic process such as an election. “During the period of reforms, the people voted for Chancellor.” “I vote we go with Martok’s attack plan.”


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3 thoughts on “vote, cast a ballot

  1. Felix Malmenbeck says:

    Cultural note:

    Although the Klingon Empire is not a democracy in the 24th century, the concept of voting would probably not be entirely foreign. After the fall of the Second Dynasty, a few hundred years before the events of DS9, there was a period of about ten years when the empire was ruled by a council elected by the people. Klingons refer to this time as “the Dark Time”.

    Also, although Klingons don’t appear to get much say in the actions of their superiors, voting does appear to occur within groups of equals, such as the Klingon High Council. In the comic book story Losses (part of the excellent Blood Will Tell series), Kahnrah must make his way to the Great Hall without getting assassinated, in order to cast his (decisive) vote in favor of allowing the Federation to assist the empire in the wake of the Praxis catastrophe.

    During the Dominion War, Chancellor Martok said “The Klingon Empire votes to attack now before they have time to recover.”. However, it is unclear if he said this in Klingon or in English.

    …and, of course, this only considers decisions made by the (warrior-dominated) ruling class during a few centuries; it’s possible that individual houses, factions or clubs use voting to a greater extent.

  2. De'vID says:

    Obviously, this entry is self-referential. We can’t talk about voting on the wish list without it. Or maybe we could use the pe”egh idiom to say that we give an entry a point, like wIvvam vIpe’pu’. That obviously works less well with people in an election. martaq vIpe’pu’ might be misinterpreted.

  3. Daniel Morse says:

    There has been voting by Klingons in a council.  The method of voting “no” is to cross one’s arms and turn one’s back.  Apparently, a “yes” vote would be crossing one’s arms and remaining facing forward.

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