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Word: pull up

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Description/Reason:

a body movement where a humanoid grips something overhead, with the backs of their hands facing them, then raises their body through muscular effort until their head above their hands. It may be done repeatedly as physical training, or once in order to e.g. climb over a wall. The equivalent movement with the palms facing the warrior is called a chin up, and if Klingons distinguish between the two I would be interested in that terminology. I don't know if it's a noun {Soch XXXmey neH vIta'laH} or a verb {tlhoy' vItoSmeH jIXXX} or perhaps the wall is the object and {tlhoy' vIXXX 'e' vInID}. I am interested in any bodyweight exercises Klingons name, and also interested if Maltz says he's familiar with the exercise but there's no name for it, so it's just {tlhoy'Daq pep'egh, DeSDu' lo'taHvIS}.


Comment below with feedback and suggestions.

5 thoughts on “pull up

    • Qov says:

      Shortly after I learned to do a pull-up I was got locked into a walled compound. I was able to jump and catch my fingers on the edge of the wall–and it was a ridiculous amount of fun to be able to pull myself up so I could get over the wall. I didn’t want to present it as only something that was done for training. It’s a useful manoeuvre, too.

      • Andrew Miller says:

        Hahahaha, no I mean the Wall of Text. Why all the hemming and hawing about what the thing could be called, when a simple definition would suffice? I think it’s extremely likely that Klingons do this. They’re humanoids who exercise a lot. No need to second- and third- and fourth- and fifth- and sixth-guess yourself.

        • Qov says:

          Oh I see. That’s wall o’ text in my ideolect. The submission interface was a single line so I couldn’t really see the effect. It’s because …

          1. I’m very resistant to the idea of telling Marc what word we want. I want to describe this action, but I don’t want to dictate if it’s a noun or a verb and what its object or subject should be. I wish to be surprised and delighted by how it works, and I want Marc more often to exercise his right to say, “no, Maltz says there’s no word for that.” If there’s another animal that is remarkably like a Terran anything, I don’t want to know.

          2. While I do think that anyone who needs to be remain physically fit in the confines of a ship does these exercises, I can imagine myself, back in the days when the vocabulary was the vocabulary, and we weren’t going to get more if there wasn’t a movie about it, giving the Klingonsplanation that Klingons only did weapons and attack drills, from the day they could hold a blade, and wanted to cut that objection off at the pass by describing why it was useful in and of itself.

          3. I’m not entirely sure I knew what a pull-up was four years ago, and certainly didn’t know the difference between a pull-up and a chin-up and didn’t want to put that burden on Marc or other Klingonists.

          4. I’m stupidly proud that I learned to do pull-ups and am taking every opportunity to brag about it.

          I secretly hope that Marc comes up with some ridiculously impossible exercise that is the the standard “drop and give me ten” of the tlhIngan QI’ Sun pat, that I then have to take months learning how to do, and can demonstrate at the next in-person qep’a’.

          • Andrew Miller says:

            MO is well aware of the concerns behind (1). Sometimes the final form of a successfully requested word is different from what is exactly requested. Take SIprat bristle from 2020, which was originally asked for as a verb. Or ‘IlHa’ be insincere which resulted from an inquiry about how to talk about hypocrisy.

            You don’t really hear (2) as an argument around here, since Klingons already have plenty of words for Terran things anyway.

            Regarding (3), in general if two things are as similar to each other as pull-ups and chin-ups are, I will list both options as one entry, and figure out ways of distinguishing them on my own. Perhaps somehow with Dopbogh toch and Dopbogh chap.

            My concern about the length of the description comes from dealing with Internet culture in general. Now, I’d like to think that I’m certainly not so petty as to oppose a good idea just because I have to read a long description, and I haven’t observed much of such pettiness in this forum in particular. But the aether of the Internet is a harsh mistress, and some personalities will downvote anything that causes them inconvenience. Just something to keep in mind. It would be a shame to get other users grumbling about otherwise good ideas. So information like (4) is probably best saved for the comment section like this, or else in the LK Fb group or the mailing-list.

            And while we’re at it, I share your hopes for (5). qIvon-ups!

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