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Word: anyway, regardless

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Contrarily to, or overcoming, a previously-established obstacle. "I did not want to go to Kronos; regardless, I went." "Kor said it was going to rain. You went outside anyway, and now you're all wet."


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9 thoughts on “anyway, regardless

  1. Andrew Miller says:

    Could be handled with HeQ comply:
    Qo’noS vIjaH vIneHbe’, ‘ach tagha’ jIHeQpu’ ‘ej pa’ jIjaHpu’.
    I did not want to go to Kronos, but at last I complied and went there.

    Or with qap insist.
    tugh SIS ja’ta’ qor. Hur DajaHta’ ‘e’ Daqap, vaj DaH bIyIQchoHchu’pu’.
    Kor said “It will rain soon”. You insisted on going outside, so now you have become totally wet.

    • Rhona Fenwick says:

      I feel like qap in the second is a little too English – it’s true that one might literally insist in contradiction of another’s spoken opinion, but in other circumstances I feel it’d be a calque of the English.

      The one with HeQ, however, is a good recasting and one I hadn’t considered.

      • Andrew Miller says:

        So, to clarify, do you regard the sentential object of qap as preferably a statement (insist that you [in fact] went outside) instead of an outcome of action (insist on your going outside [in spite of X]? Do I have that right?

        As a thought experiment, how do you feel about the following?
        Qu’ QobvaD beqpu’ mIt DIngachtaHvIS, bIjeS ‘e’ lubot ‘e’ lunID latlhpu’, ‘ach qaqapta’.
        While we were debating the suitable crew for the dangerous mission, the others tried to prevent you from participating, but I insisted (on) you.

        • Rhona Fenwick says:

          Yep, that’s right; because Klingon has no subjunctive/irrealis, when I hear mej ‘e’ Daqap, my immediate thought is of it as a pure statement (I insist that he leaves, I insist that he is leaving) rather than an indirect order (I insist that he leave).

          Regarding your example …bIjeS ‘e’ lubot ‘e’ lunID latlhpu’, ‘ach qaqapta’: apart from the question of whether one can say qaqap at all (which is itself a toughie – it’s still working my head over a bit), to me it seems to come down again to whether one allows an irrealis interpretation of the object. Is qap upholding a claim that is, or demanding a claim that should be?

          Since we don’t actually have any explicit canon for qap, though, you’ve given me some food for thought in any case.

  2. qurgh says:

    To me, it seems like “anyway” is mostly used to just emphasis something that happen. Those sentences could be translated with just ‘ach and have the same meaning.

    “I did not want to go to Kronos; regardless, I went.” – Qo’noS vISuch vIneHbe’ ‘ach vISuchI did not want to visit Kronos however I went (anyway)

    “Kor said it was going to rain. You went outside anyway, and now you’re all wet.” – tugh SIS ja’pu’ qor, ‘ach Hur DajaHpu’ ‘ej DaH bIyIQqu’“Soon it will rain” reported Kor, however you went outside (anyway) and now you are very wet”

     

    • Rhona Fenwick says:

      The same could be said for vabDot, but that’s one we have nonetheless (e.g. vabDot Sovbe’ targhwIj “even my targ won’t know” – why not just Sovbe’ targhwIj’e’, or even the further option of Sovbe’ je targhwIj “my targh won’t know either”). My question is along the lines of whether there’s something that’s more or less opposed to vabDot:

      Sovbe’ yaSpu’, Sovbe’ Qang, ‘ej vabDot Sovbe’ voDleH: the officers don’t know, the chancellor doesn’t know, and even the emperor doesn’t know
      Sovbe’ yaSpu’, Sovbe’ Qang, ‘ach [???] Sovbe’ voDleH: the officers don’t know, the chancellor doesn’t know, but the emperor knows anyway

      It may be as simple as ??vabDotHa’, but I’d like to know this for sure (especially given that even canon for vabDot is pretty slim).

      • Andrew Miller says:

        I forget if this had already been suggested, but vabDotHa’ might be closer to something like of course or as expected or やっぱり yappari in Japanese. There seems to be an element of surprise or stretching outwards from expectation in vabDot. “Even Earth is up for grabs” is the usage from Monopoly, if I remember correctly, as though one might think that Earth was off-limits for being conquered by the Klingons. So vabDotHa’ would theoretically indicate conformity with expectation.

        Your example with the ‘information pyramid’ of officers, chancellor and emperor is a good way to tease out another sense of ‘anyway’, for which neither of my suggested verbs above are appropriate. Perhaps:

        The officers don’t know, the chancellor doesn’t know, but these two situations don’t keep the emperor from knowing.
        Sovbe’ yaSpu’, ‘ej Sovbe’ Qang, ‘ach Sov voDleH ‘e’ lubotbe’ cha’ ghu’meyvam.

        • qa'HoS says:

          I tend to agree with your take vabDotHa’. It would be a useful term to have. Also, it would be great if Okrand were to finally establish which adverbials can take {Ha’} and define their meaning.

        • Rhona Fenwick says:

          I forget if this had already been suggested, but vabDotHa’ might be closer to something like of course or as expected or やっぱり yappari in Japanese. There seems to be an element of surprise or stretching outwards from expectation in vabDot.

          Oh, I’m not intending to suggest that this is even what I believe ??vabDotHa’ to mean, only that it might be one possibility. (And it just goes to prove the point, in some ways. Different people have different interpretations of some adverb-Ha’ combinations, to the point where ??wejHa’ to date has, I believe, three equally possible but highly divergent suggestions for its meaning.)

          “Even Earth is up for grabs” is the usage from Monopoly, if I remember correctly, as though one might think that Earth was off-limits for being conquered by the Klingons. So vabDotHa’ would theoretically indicate conformity with expectation.

          That makes sense, as vabDot has been explicitly described as referring to a situation that’s surprising or counterintuitive. But with that said, that’s kind of what anyway, regardless means in English: the chancellor doesn’t know, but the emperor knows anyway. So I suppose the question then becomes, is vabDot only referring to a situation that’s surprising or counterintuitive to the speaker (i.e. mirativity), or can it also mean a situation that’s deemed generally surprising or counterintuitive within a preceding context? So if one were to say Sovbe’ Qang ‘ach vabDot Sovqu’ voDleH, can that mean the chancellor doesn’t know, but the emperor knows anyway?

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